LSD

LSD 1966

Listen to LSD, Klunks Klan and WWH on Spotify

We where the bands that played in the shadows of the big local bands ( in this case bands like Beathovens, 14, MT Else, etc). These bands in turn had to settle with playing in the shadows of the bands that where established all over the country, like Tages, Shanes, Namelosers and others.

We where the bands that really did practice in basements and garages and whose equipment consisted of all kinds of gathered things, assembled from old radios, speakers and amplifiers. The drum sets would today only be good for display in a museum somewhere. The height of a career could be not having to play as first band in one of the many frequent pop shows that where held almost all weekends at different locations in the province. One important ambition was to get together a repertoire that lasted long enough for a school dance, 25-30 songs. That these never had more than three chords each was a matter of style. If there were more, then it was jazz. To tune the instruments with any sort of precision was considered snobbish.

LSD4

We were mods, and we where the first generation to declare war on the adult world and its values. We have had many followers. The pop shows in Vadstena where magnificent events. The days before the concerts was a very exiting time for us mods and others interested in music. The order in which the bands would play was discussed and there were intense speculations about what new songs could be expected to appear on the repertoires of the featured bands.
-If Beathovens are playing “Cadillac”, then we can’t do it.

“14” was a fantastic live band with two great singers that sang their pops songs, respectively, R&B songs. I will never forget their rough version of Chuck Berry’s “You Came A Long Way From S.T. Louis”. The rule of the local scene was between them and Beathovens. But there where many other unforgettable and sometimes unlikely constellations that showed up at the concerts. Harwesters from Vikingstad where one of these bands.I remember them as a mixed group, girls and guys 15-16 years old that played only Stones covers with a hick, punk attitude that surpassed most of what I’ve heard since that time. “Don Martins” that were from Mjoelby were another super group. During their best period their shows revolved around the “Sorrows” LP from ‘65, and they played the material with impressing precision. “Those Kids” where a duo that had one of the best singers of that time on the mic. They did songs like “Eve of Destruction” and others. His voice was powerful.

The sixties classic place for rock music for us that lived in those regions was Gillet in Motala.During a few years Gillet received the elite of what Swedish pop and rock had to offer.I especially remember the “Panthers” from Ljusdal that were damn cool, and actually the “Sleepstones” that played the “Five LiveYardbirds” LP straight through. At an amazing speed. The best local bands, Beathovens gigs at Gillet are classic, also got a bit of attention. LSD though, never had enough status for an offer like that. But we clearly had it going on and had a group of fans when we split up in ‘67. This was a consequence, I remember, of someone getting pretentious and starting to talk about melody and more chords.
Klunk’s Klan was the embryo for LSD. Three 13-14 year olds first inspired and totally unschooled expressions for the need to participate in what now is called R & R.

WWH (We Want Help) was a band that competed with LSD. They had a more polished image and new a few more chords. Vadstena probably wasn’t too different from other small towns during the middle of the sixties. It was a sleeping ideal world, and it was against that we were reacting. In the years of 65-66 there were probably 5-6 active bands, out of which one was all girls band. In the neighboring city Motala there must have been twice that number. Many had charm as well as class. Klunk’s Klan, that never played to the public, and LSD, that opened up a few pop shows, perhaps didn’t have the greatest talents. But we took part in defining a period and we where totally dedicated to our mission.

UGLY THINGS Magazine review:
I know it‚s been said a million times (OK about a half dozen): rock n roll transcends simply music, so it really doesn‚t matter what some egghead calls good or bad. It‚s the inspirationn that counts. I mean, sure Elvis and the Stones were talented on all levels, but what about those folks who had little or no talent but a shitload of inspiration. I think I speak for most ugly readers when I say this explains our being in awe of such performers as Jack Starr, The Rats, Menster Phip, T Valentine, Musical Linn Twins, The Keggs, Tyrone Schmidling, and so many others who gave so much and yet cared so little for such pleasantries as production value or even a sense of rhythm. And don‚t give me that “so bad it’s good crap”, or any of these slumming johnny-cum-lately lo-fiers, because it‚s just not the same thing! Along with the release last year of the amazing Los Saicos LP, it‚s good to see the rest of the world digging up prime samples of long lost gutter genius. This LP doesn‚t come close to that sheer dementia, but I love it cuz it showcase the simple joy of some kids just trying to be part of the rock n roll experience. This record documents the musical devolution of Martin Thornstrom, pride of Vadstena, Sweden, who played maladroit guitar for most of the bands here. I don‚t know why, but thank God he saved these tapes. Martin‚sfirst group Klunk‚s Klan were in his words „three 13-14 year old‚s first inspired and totally unschooled expressions for the need to participate in what is now called rock & roll.‰ Unschooled just ain‚t the word for this kinda‚ sick bashing. Their four trakcs alone make this an instant inductee into the Valhalla of Amateurism. Their atonal stumbling through typical R&B covers of the Day („Dimples‰, Shakin All Over‰) have a Shaggs-like charm that today‚s artsy fartsys can never figure out. I swear this versionof „Hound Dog‰ would even leave Lightning Beat-Man disoriented. If this album runs chronologically then Martin‚s next misadventure was backing one Staffan Gustavson who sounds all of yhree-years-old, on a sidesplitting „Baldheaded Woman‰.Using equipment built from old radios, speakers and amplifiers they indeed „declared war on the adult world‰Ý.boy, I‚ll say. Martin reached the alpha and omega of his life as a rock star with his next band LSD (funny name cuz there sure as hell ain‚t even a whiff of psychedelia, and how much you wanna bet any of Œem ever took anything stronger than Pripps Lager). Their one and only goal was not being the opening act at shows where bands like the Beathovens were headliners (the Beathovens in turn were at the bottom of the bills at gigs with groups like the Namelosers,which gives you an idea how low our heroes were on the totem pole). Alas, it was a dream never realized. Side two features the band drenched in flopsweat giving a shambling performance of more fucked R&B standards. It would have been nice if they had tried to come up with some original material, but that woulda been askin‚ to much of Œem, and besides when I listened to this it was like hearing these tunes for the first time! Mr. Thornström „That these songs never had more than three chords each was a matter of style. If there was more, then it was jazz. To tune the instruments with any sort of precision was considered snobbish.‰ YEAH! If you, like me, never wanted to hear „I Got You (I Feel Good)‰ again, just wait till you get a load of their Uszmewiczized version. Only slightly more proficient than Klunk‚s Klan. They didn‚t care if anyone else was enjoying it ˆ they were having fun nad that‚s what comes through load and clear. By the way, in case you were wondering. LSD‚s chief competition were ˆ I‚m serious ˆ We Want Help, who were, ahemÝ. „more polished‰. WWH offer up an original shitcan masterpiece called (what else?) „Tell Me Why People Don‚t Like Me‰ ˆ a snivelling snotnose theme song that makes the bands of Teenage Shutdown: No Tease sound like The Smiths. Damn it, we need a whole album by these guys. Oh and whatever happened to LSD you ask? They finally pulled the plug on themselves in 1967, becauseÝwell, take it away, Martin, „This was the consequence of someone getting pretentious and starting to talk about melody and more chords.‰ My pick albume of the year. – Jack Hemsley / Ugly Things magazine

KLUNKS KLAN personnel:
Martin Thornström: Guitar
K-G Johansson: Drums
Torbjörn Gustavsson: Vocals, Bass

WWH personnel:
Putte Kullander: Lead Guitar
Ola Harder: Guitar
Lars Dankwardt-Liljeström: Lead Vocals, Bass
Lasse Fredriksson: Vocals
Bosse Ahlstedt: Drums

LSD personnel:
Martin Thornström: Guitar
Göran Kjulsten: Bass
Bo Simonsson: Lead Guitar
K-G Johansson: Drums
Jan Erik Karlsson: Vocals